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Even though your new crown is made from materials that are not subject to tooth decay, you will still need to brush and floss it twice each day. If residual food particles and plaque are allowed to adhere to the crown near the gum line it will greatly increase your chances of developing gum disease. This can pose multiple threats to the crown’s longevity.

The advanced form of gum disease, known as periodontitis can cause your gums to recede from the base of your teeth, allowing small pockets of infection to form in your gums. Constant bacterial exposure in this area can allow bacteria direct access to the seam where the crown is cemented to the abutment.

This could potentially start to weaken the cement causing the crown to become loose or fall out. Given enough time, periodontitis can even cause a loss of bone structure that anchor the abutments to your jaw.

Twice-daily brushing and flossing can help clean and maintain the crown. However, it is still possible for some tartar to form. This can only effectively be removed by the tools and techniques employed during Dr. Cynthia E. Sherwood’s regular dental checkup.

If you have questions or concerns about how to clean and maintain your new crown, you should call Dr. Cynthia E. Sherwood’s office in Independence, Kansas at (620) 331.4499 to set up an appointment.